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WeForest Project

Title

Tanzania

Transitioning villages to agroforestry
Area restored
Trees
1,755,980

Project Summary

In Mara, the extraction of resources from forests has caused local smallholder farmers to struggle with infertile soil, low water tables and erratic rainfall. Seedlings are grown in nurseries and distributed to the people that need it most. Through agroforestry systems on their farms and schools, the farmers and institutional beneficiaries are able to grow their own fodder, fuelwood, fiber, fruit and timber, and so no longer need to depend on forests for consumption or income generation.

  • Tanzania nursery
    Nursery workers preparing pots so that the seeds can germinate.
  • TAN_Nursery
    At work in one of the nurseries.
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    A restoration plot.
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    Working on an irrigation system at the tree nursery.
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    Three-year-old trees.
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    8 year-old trees
  • Tanzania woman
    Our Tanzania project empowers women, who make up the majority of the world’s poor and are more vulnerable to the effects of climate change.
  • Beneficiary farmer
    "I am thankful to the local tree nursery for providing me with seedlings and training for many years" - Patrick K.

Region

Mara region, Northwestern Tanzania

Project Status

Open

Restoration Approach

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Planting
,
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Agroforestry

Project Partners

Global Resource Alliance 

Project Goals

Restore native forest
Increase food security
Create access to clean water
Promote access to medicinal and other forest products

 

 

Latest Project News

Tanzania video
How to make a tree grow?
| 19 March
14 January 2019
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Planting trees for our children
| 02 February
2 February 2017
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Planting trees at schools
| 06 December
6 December 2016
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Welcome to Muhundwe Primary School
| 10 November
10 November 2016

Why is intervention needed?

In the Mara Region of Tanzania, the untenable extraction of resources from forests has negatively impacted water, soil and climate, causing local smallholder farmers to struggle with infertile soil, low water tables and erratic rainfall.

Ecological restoration

Through agroforestry systems on their farms, the farmers and institutional beneficiaries are able to grow their own fodder, fuelwood, fiber, fruit and timber, and so no longer need to depend on local forest stands for consumption or income generation. This farm landscape restoration ultimately means forests have the opportunity to regenerate and are conserved for the long-term. In addition, the woody perennials planted improve soil fertility and water recharge, increasing crop yields and pastureland fodder for livestock. Fruit and timber trees provide food, fuelwood and shade.

Livelihood development

Beneficiaries of this project include smallholder farmers and institutions such as schools and churches. Agroforestry improves and conserves all natural resources - water, soil, biodiversity - on their land so that they are able to continuously grow and sell their own food and woody products instead of extracting and clearing local forests.

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